Forums > Stand Up Paddle   Board Talk & Reviews

Board volumes for women

Reply
Created by Kisutch 1 month ago, 5 Dec 2020
Kisutch
9 posts
5 Dec 2020 11:57PM
Thumbs Up

My wife is 60 kg and has experience with high volume inflatable SUPs in flat water and rivers. I want to take her surfing. What sort of longboard would be ideal to try to demo/borrow? Seems like boards that have volumes 2-x her weight would be performance models that are maybe less stable than all arounder? On first time, should I way overshoot on volume (like 160L) to reduce wobbles and frustration, or will a XL board be slow and harder to catch waves on (like my inflatable is)?Thanks a bunch for any help.

colas
4071 posts
6 Dec 2020 1:21AM
Thumbs Up

Forget volume, at 60kg all the boards on the market will have enough. And a big volume boards will frighten her in the surf as she will feel she cannot master the huge push of the waves on it when she will get into the water and meet the first broken waves.

I would not go more than 2x her weigth (120l)

look only at enough width for stability (I guess 30"+ should be OK) and enough length to get into waves easily (at very least 8'6"). And wide nose and tail.

LeeD
2119 posts
6 Dec 2020 2:33AM
Thumbs Up

Timid or brave?
Does she adapt quickly?
Is she adventurous?
Is she athletic?

Kisutch
9 posts
6 Dec 2020 5:18AM
Thumbs Up

Thanks for replies

She's athletic and adventurous, but I could see her getting frustrated during first time on smaller board when you start falling and then get worn out and fall more. She does HIIT training so prob better prepared than I was first time in surf.
Cool that if I got her a 120L longboard it would be something I could surf myself for my next drop in size:)

LastSupper
VIC, 255 posts
6 Dec 2020 10:57PM
Thumbs Up

As Colas said ! 120 lts or less if she wants to surf ! Big boards r not good to learn on ! Surfin on a sup is a mind set of really wanting to do it ! Falling in and frustration r the norm !

lam
VIC, 143 posts
6 Dec 2020 11:30PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
LastSupper said..
As Colas said ! 120 lts or less if she wants to surf ! Big boards r not good to learn on ! Surfin on a sup is a mind set of really wanting to do it ! Falling in and frustration r the norm !


Wise words. When people ask what's the secret of surfing on a sup, my reply is always, every time you come off you climb back on and eventually you will fall off less and less.

Gboots
NSW, 1035 posts
7 Dec 2020 6:49AM
Thumbs Up

I am 60 - 63kg dry ....but make. I have a few boards at 120ish. Speeed 88 and Acid 91. Both performance shape boards even though high volume . On wave they are fine . Off board and in white water harder to manage . If surfing 2ft or less no probs to manage away from crowds . The Acid can handle a bit more juice beat that volume . The Speeed with its parallel outline wants to just throw you off when waves get faster or larger . There use to be a board in Starboard range called Converse . 9'0 by 30. That was a great shape for allround paddling and small waves for lighter riders

slsurf
23 posts
7 Dec 2020 4:34AM
Thumbs Up

Went thru similar with wife. 9 x 29-30 120 liter longboard shape is like an aircraft carrier for someone that size but great suggestion as 1st board which will be outgrown quickly if she progresses beyond casual/small waves so might not want to invest much in it. She should feel rock solid paddling the new board and turning it in flatwater before venturing into surf to save frustration. If a person wasn't a surfer prior to sup it will be much harder. For lighter intermediate surfers you almost always have to go custom to get a stable outline with volume 1.4 to 1.6, the production boards are specd for much heavier riders.

BigZ
85 posts
7 Dec 2020 12:18PM
Thumbs Up

Get her a high performance longboard shape around 100l. It will be very stable in flat water and will let her gradually progress to bigger and bigger waves. She will never outgrow it and if she gets hooked on SUP surfing she can add an 80l or so board to the quiver. There are in fact quite a few production SUP longboards in that size, including Starboard, Naish, Sunova, and Infinity.

I went through the similar process with my daughter who is 5'11 and 65kg. She started on a 8'4x29x105l sup longboard (custom Hobie) and after a challenging couple of sessions she is very comfortable and loves the board. She has recently got a 85l "shortboardish" style sup but does not plan to get rid of a longboard.

SupChickadee
VIC, 108 posts
8 Dec 2020 9:53PM
Thumbs Up

How old is your wife?
i'm a great believer in getting a sup big enough to get "glide" as women aren't as strong paddlers as men.
To get the most enjoyment from sup surfing at the beginning and also for less than perfect days i would recommend a sup around 9x30 up to around 130 litres is the sweet spot.
A sup at that size in as light a construction as you can afford (or 2nd hand) to make carting around easier.
Yes ladies being lighter in Kg's can in theory go for very small volume sups, but what about the enjoyment factor of a sup that can easily handle any conditions and catch waves with ease, which is what you should get at the above specs. and enjoy the fun factor

Gboots
NSW, 1035 posts
9 Dec 2020 6:19AM
Thumbs Up

An old video but listen to what Scott says at around 1 min19 onward about riders for this 9 by 30. An ideal shape for anyone on small waves

Kisutch
9 posts
11 Dec 2020 2:29AM
Thumbs Up

Thanks for all the great advice!

Kisutch
9 posts
11 Dec 2020 2:40AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
SupChickadee said..
How old is your wife?
i'm a great believer in getting a sup big enough to get "glide" as women aren't as strong paddlers as men.
To get the most enjoyment from sup surfing at the beginning and also for less than perfect days i would recommend a sup around 9x30 up to around 130 litres is the sweet spot.
A sup at that size in as light a construction as you can afford (or 2nd hand) to make carting around easier.
Yes ladies being lighter in Kg's can in theory go for very small volume sups, but what about the enjoyment factor of a sup that can easily handle any conditions and catch waves with ease, which is what you should get at the above specs. and enjoy the fun factor


This sounds right to me, as a beginner myself. My wife's 39. My first times on hardboard was on fast (for me) longboard that made it easy to catch waves early. The shorter board I bought is more fun on wave but definitely harder for me to catch waves. I'd have been fine learning on it but wouldn't have been as fun... though I had a blast flailing in a giant inflatable years back so I'm easily entertained.

StoneyFTS
QLD, 1 posts
11 Dec 2020 9:48PM
Thumbs Up

Follow the Sun site has alot of good info in the hints and tips

There is a lot of good information on Paddle Boarding that we get asked alot in the bay and on the water.

Like above the formula is twice your weight, but width and tail width also makes the boards more stable. Would suggest to try as many boards as possible and the better surf shops and manufacturers have demo boards available.

The main thing for women is weight, most inflatables are heavy and heavy packed up. Also are hard to get the last few psi when pumping by hand. Would suggest a hard board is worth the investment, just be sure to buy something that is not chinese one brand import.

Enjoy

supthecreek
2107 posts
25 Dec 2020 12:50AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Kisutch said..
My wife is 60 kg and has experience with high volume inflatable SUPs in flat water and rivers. I want to take her surfing. What sort of longboard would be ideal to try to demo/borrow? Seems like boards that have volumes 2-x her weight would be performance models that are maybe less stable than all arounder? On first time, should I way overshoot on volume (like 160L) to reduce wobbles and frustration, or will a XL board be slow and harder to catch waves on (like my inflatable is)?Thanks a bunch for any help.


Hi Kisutch
Sorry I'm late to the party...
If your wife has never surfed before, the combined challenge of learning waves and lineup behavior will be fairly substantial.... add to that a board that has "theoretical stability" could possibly make it harder than necessary.

By theoretical stability, I mean using standard volume and width guides, as accepted by experienced surfers.
Most newbies will benefit greatly from a board with more than ample surface area.
Volume is simply a number that can be arrived at from many directions. Thickness, length, shape.

A design with reasonable width through the length, adds a lot of support from all areas of the board.
I personally think an allround shape 9'5 x 32" at any volume under 160 L would be worth considering for an easier transition to wave riding.
With fullness in the nose and hips, but thin enough to keep the weight down.

Over the years, I have put MANY women on boards in the surf... and I always choose 9'5/9'6 x 32 around 150 liters.
This is a magic size that gives easy stability, good glide into waves and manageable weight (all the boards I put them on are well constructed)

Even with youth, easy stability and calm conditions, new SUP surfers struggle with the challenge.
I figure, why not make it as pleasant as possible.... and give the best chance for them to fall in love with the sport?

After they advance to a smaller board, the 9'6 will always be a good recreational paddler for family and friends.... or a wonky conditions board for surf.

First ever surf session for the girl in these pics, who is a seasoned distance racer, mid 30's and still found herself kneeling a lot in glassy conditions. 9'5 x 32" at 160 liters was NOT too big for her.... it was what she needed to enjoy her first attempt in the surf.

She loved that the board was only 10 kg, for an easy carry, for the long walk back to the car.










cbigsup
436 posts
27 Dec 2020 3:53AM
Thumbs Up

As a surfer who struggled to get it. Olde fahrte 64 kegs. It's all about the WIDTH.

Anything less than 32" is silly and a waste of time, and money.

A tennis pro once told me don't practice your mistakes.

A narrow board on a light person could lead to practicing the many ways of falling and NOT having any fun WHATSOEVER!

Cheers!

colas
4071 posts
27 Dec 2020 11:28PM
Thumbs Up

Well, width also depends on your height.

a width of 30" 1/4 for a A 5'6" gal will be proportionally like 33" for a 6' tall guy.

cbigsup
436 posts
28 Dec 2020 3:51AM
Thumbs Up

I am 5'7". We were discussing ease of learning not a final ideal width. I HAD to go to 32" to get it initially. Competed in ESA Champs as a short boarder. All my initial boards from shops where I was known were way to narrow.

I would still advise getting a 32" wide board to get it easily and have fun. I noticed STC made the same recommendation..

colas
4071 posts
28 Dec 2020 2:45PM
Thumbs Up

Well, I am a bit under 5'6" myself, and 30" was easy for me (and my daughters), provided the board had wide nose and tail, which is the more important thing for a beginner. 32" but with pulled in nose and tail will be worse, both because of the added unstability and row effect of the curved outline.

Gboots
NSW, 1035 posts
29 Dec 2020 5:51PM
Thumbs Up

I still reckon 9 by 30 or 9'2 by 30
are a great option . Easy to manage out of water as well.
This is a good option .
I learnt on an inflatable version at 60-65kg. Flat water then surf

www.starboard.co.nz/products/2018-starboard-sup-surf-90-x-30-converse-starlite



Subscribe
Reply

Forums > Stand Up Paddle   Board Talk & Reviews


"Board volumes for women" started by Kisutch